Author Topic: C.S.S. David  (Read 10907 times)

Offline Ernie

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 371
    • View Profile
C.S.S. David
« on: November 18, 2011, 05:00:08 AM »
I though I  would post this here, please forgive me if this is out of place. As I mentioned in my introduction I like to build different types of models, and I also like to try to sample kits from different manufactures. This is the C.S.S. David, a torpedo boat from the American Civil War. It is a kind of interesting subject, and the kit is made by Cottage Industry Models. It is resin and white metal. As the real boat was not painted, this will be a good exercise in painting wood grain.  If it is not out of place, and you guys are interested in seeing how it goes, I would like to build it, if it does not fit, that is okay too.

http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i179/captianplastic/Decorated%20images/017.jpg
C.S.S. David


http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i179/captianplastic/Decorated%20images/018-1.jpg
C.S.S. David


Ernie
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 03:51:22 PM by Ernie »

Offline No.1

  • Administrator and Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 20741
  • Owner: www.letletlet-warplanes.com
    • View Profile
    • LetLetLet - Warplanes
Re: Any Intrest in This?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2011, 07:30:36 AM »
This is so good choice mate :-ok Hope you will have time to keep this progress build, this is so interesting. Thanks to the cottage industry many interesting subject could be find. One question- what kind of protection was used in that time for wood? I think wood used on water.

Offline Sall

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4641
  • Build what YOU want,the way YOU want to,and above all-have fun!
    • View Profile
Re: Any Intrest in This?
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2011, 11:20:45 AM »
Uuuuhhhhh... This is sooo interesting!! I would like to see more. Go forward mateeee!! :-tri

Offline Ernie

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 371
    • View Profile
Re: Any Intrest in This?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 01:56:49 PM »
Thank you guys. No.1, as far as I can tell, no protection against the water was used, the hull was made of Oak and the seams between each plank were most likely caulked with tar, the water would have caused the planks to swell, helping to seal the seams. I do not know what the builders thought the life span of the vessel would have been either. At this point many of these creations were experiments, this one was built in the back yard of the designer! It did prove successful enough that depending upon the source that you use for reference between 4 and 50 more were built; I tend to think 50 is a bit much, and the number built were much lower. Plus the others were lumped together and generically called David's after the original, making it a bit more confusing to determine the actually number, and even the original from later copies. Interestingly, many people refer to this as a submarine, and while it does look like one, it was made to ride low on the water and was open on the top, so it could not submerge ( well it could, but only once :) ).
This is one reason I like kits from small manufactures, there are so many different subjects available, and often a lot of modelers pass them by.
Ernie

Offline No.1

  • Administrator and Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 20741
  • Owner: www.letletlet-warplanes.com
    • View Profile
    • LetLetLet - Warplanes
Re: Any Intrest in This?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2011, 02:53:44 PM »
Nico info mate :) One old and effective method used by manufactured was cooking wax with oil of turpentine and then hot brushed over surface. In the joint was used thin rope which is deep into that solution or something similar and push inside with small hammers. But it is possible in the rush that no protection was used, they are simply delivered for fast actions. Design is very nice for that time.

Offline Ernie

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 371
    • View Profile
Re: Any Intrest in This?
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 03:49:38 PM »
Nico info mate :) One old and effective method used by manufactured was cooking wax with oil of turpentine and then hot brushed over surface. In the joint was used thin rope which is deep into that solution or something similar and push inside with small hammers. But it is possible in the rush that no protection was used, they are simply delivered for fast actions. Design is very nice for that time.

Yes, that was my other thought also, some type of oil/wax/paraffin mixture used on the wood. sadly, none of these boats have survived, and many were left to rot after the war ended. At least one was taken to the U.S. Naval Academy but more as a war prize I think than as an example to be studied. Or perhaps the hulls were treated in a manner that was typical for that time and so it was not recorded as anything special, because it was a standard pratice. I will look into some more as now you have made me curious.
Ernie

Offline No.1

  • Administrator and Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 20741
  • Owner: www.letletlet-warplanes.com
    • View Profile
    • LetLetLet - Warplanes
Re: C.S.S. David
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2011, 03:54:52 PM »
I love when some research is need, this give some charm to build projects :))

Offline javier_planells

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 144
  • "Words will always retain their power."
    • View Profile
    • The Modeling Underdog - A haven of bad taste for the faint hearted.
Javier Planells
"Do you know what Nemesis means? It is a righteous infliction of retribution manifested by an appropriate agent, personified in this case by a horrible bastard, ME."

Offline No.1

  • Administrator and Owner
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 20741
  • Owner: www.letletlet-warplanes.com
    • View Profile
    • LetLetLet - Warplanes
Re: C.S.S. David
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2011, 06:54:29 PM »
This is great info Javier  :-clap At least fro me who is not informed much about this battle ship. This image...



Show that the wooden construction was cover with layer of something. It look like asphalt to me  :-think

Offline draken35

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7346
    • View Profile
Re: C.S.S. David
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2011, 06:57:54 PM »
Great subject!!!

I'm impatient to see more!!!


Offline javier_planells

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 144
  • "Words will always retain their power."
    • View Profile
    • The Modeling Underdog - A haven of bad taste for the faint hearted.
Re: C.S.S. David
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2011, 08:14:50 PM »
I'm tempted to believe that there were differences beetween Davids. They were "cottage" industry after all. A single chimney for the stove and a breather for the stern section seem common place. My personal opinion is that while they were built using the clinker way, they also had a coat of tar to make them water proof. After all, they were semi-submersible and having a very low profile, very prone to embarking water, even in a river like enviroment. And the dark hue of tar was also perfect for night operations as well. :-wch

I have a longing penchant for Confederate and Union ships :))
Javier Planells
"Do you know what Nemesis means? It is a righteous infliction of retribution manifested by an appropriate agent, personified in this case by a horrible bastard, ME."

Offline Sall

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4641
  • Build what YOU want,the way YOU want to,and above all-have fun!
    • View Profile
Re: C.S.S. David
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2011, 09:09:24 PM »
Excellent story Ernie!! :-clap :-clap

Offline Ernie

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 371
    • View Profile
Re: C.S.S. David
« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2011, 10:06:50 PM »
Thank you all for the comments and info!! I did not think this was going to be such a popular subject :-ok I am going to a fellow modelers this evening, and I will check his library as he may have a little information on this. I might also bring the kit and make a start on it. Thank you all again.
Ernie