LetLetLet ~ Warplanes

Let Let Let - Warplanes => Aircraft Modeling => Topic started by: Sall on December 15, 2010, 05:52:22 PM

Title: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on December 15, 2010, 05:52:22 PM
I created this topic because I am young,modellers beginner. There is much that I don't know,has yet to learn,so I wanted to consult on some techniques with you,an experienced modellers. :-flo
For now I have this question,and later they will be more... :-ok

In what way can highlight panels,that they would be "more visible" after painting.... :-think
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on December 15, 2010, 06:12:42 PM
It is late and dark now, I will make quick guide tomorrow at day light, better for photographing ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on December 15, 2010, 06:39:23 PM
Ohooohoooo...
Muchas gracias amigo! :)) :)) :-flo
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on December 16, 2010, 09:47:43 AM
So here you are simply way to get panels highlighted. You need completely painted kit and if need with coat of protective varnish. Sample image show wing of the Bf108 Taifun. Next you need pencil, HB is generally good, for stronger shading B is better. Sand small amount of graphite on sanding paper. Take this powder with brush and make paint like strokes over the panel lines. You see result very quickly. To make lighter highlights you need white pencil and go over the specific area like the fabric lines.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on December 16, 2010, 10:19:52 AM
Thanks a lot man. I will try this on Hornet.
 :-flo
Now,i must re-scribed panels. These days,i don't have much time,but next step is re-scribering.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on December 16, 2010, 11:10:42 AM
One question.
First go paint,than one or two coats of varnish,and then this technique of highlited panels.
Do you go after the highlited of the panel one more coat of varnish or not?
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on December 16, 2010, 11:13:17 AM
I have did this one completed kit, no additional varnish over
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: dragan_mig31 on December 16, 2010, 11:43:09 PM
You can also try something different.Take a simple black ink that is water based,mix one or two drops in a cup of watter + add 2 drops of liquid soap.You need to gloss the surface of the kit before this step.I ussually coat it with 4-5 gloss coats( I always use pronto/future)and than just drop a little in the panel lines.The in should flow very easily in the lines.After this dries out just wipe the exces with a toilet paper with a little moisture in it.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on December 17, 2010, 09:03:05 AM
Is it a technique called wash If it,i have heard of it.
Thank you! :-flo
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on December 17, 2010, 05:34:13 PM
Personnally, I'm using a wash for the inter panels, with oil paints: a mix of black and brown diluted with turpentine or "f" benzine (for smokers... - I'm not smoker I must say). And for the lights, I use an extremely diluted white (airbrush applied), or a lighter color than the original that sometimes I apply with a paintbrush, like a drybrush...
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on February 06, 2011, 11:41:29 AM
One of the approach to apply small decals on surface. Put the kit on something, like the glass in this way and this will show you all side of the kit. Hold the decals with reverse action tweezers and slide it on surface with brush.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on February 06, 2011, 12:06:09 PM
So i work. :-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on February 06, 2011, 01:29:28 PM
Fine!
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on March 13, 2011, 09:15:50 PM
Weathering...!?How it works? :-think
How do i know what color to use,if i use tamiya weathering set?
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on March 13, 2011, 09:24:34 PM
Try to get archive images and if possible color images of the time.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on March 13, 2011, 09:28:38 PM
Can you post any image,just for example?
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on April 06, 2011, 10:08:40 PM
Can anyone say me something about gunsight i drybrush?I don't know nothing... :-roll
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on April 06, 2011, 10:51:49 PM
What you would like to know?
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on April 06, 2011, 11:02:37 PM
Well,Dragan told me to use or do drybrush and gunsight in cockpit...I don't know how to do that and what i must use?
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on April 07, 2011, 06:49:22 PM
Dragan told me for this.Very useful explanation.

www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/tnt1/001-100/TnT087_Drybrushing_Bamford/TnT087.htm
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on April 08, 2011, 07:35:59 AM
You should simply to say what you want to do :)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on April 08, 2011, 07:55:04 AM
Well,i didn't know what i want...Becouse i didn't know anything about that technique... :-flo
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on April 08, 2011, 08:09:00 AM
I use dry brush for external painting but also for details. Corsair cockpit was made in this way, see our Group Build
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on April 08, 2011, 08:18:16 AM
 :-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on April 10, 2011, 07:00:41 AM
I was painting the Corsair from our Group Build and decided to do this "how-to" for painting glossy finishes.

 Many years ago I painted by putting my subject on a stand, placing it on a table or holding it, and spraying away. Sometimes I'd get little bits of dust in the finish unless I was extremely careful and clean. A neighbor was visiting one day when I was preparing to paint a 1/24th scale auto body and he invited me to his hangar. Inside was a full-scale Piper Cub hanging upside down from the roof of his hangar. :-eek He explained that he painted everything upside down so no dirt ever got into his paint. He used gravity to help him keep his surfaces clean. :-tri It's quite a feat to flip over a 1/1 scale airplane but the results were worth it--several paint jobs he applied won awards at aircraft shows, including a Best Of Show at Oshkosh one year. Ever since that day I paint "upside-down". I just make a stand out of safety wire that will hold the model. The rest is pretty self-explanatory.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6696.jpg)
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6697.jpg)

I also hang the finished product upside down until the paint has cured a bit. I'd rather have any dust settle on the underside during the curing process.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6698.jpg)

And the finished product:
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6700.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on April 11, 2011, 02:44:04 PM
Great! :-clap :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on May 09, 2011, 07:02:24 AM
Here's another additional painting tip. Painting tires and wheels can be somewhat tedious at times. Using a circle template is a handy (lazy, too!) way to paint wheels.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6925.jpg)
I simply paint the tire black and then find the correct diameter opening on the template sheet. Then I mask the area around the needed hole to keep from overspray. Next offer the tire/wheel up to the opening, center it carefully, and airbrush the wheel the desired color.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6927.jpg)
Here are the four wheels for the F-106 project I've been working on.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6933.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Profa on May 09, 2011, 09:33:46 AM
Wouldn't it be even better if you'd cut the mask using the template, stick it to the wheel and then paint. Of course that way you'd have to work invrsely - first paint the hub and then the tyre?
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on May 09, 2011, 10:37:34 AM
Thanks Scott! :-flo
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on May 09, 2011, 04:02:17 PM
Wouldn't it be even better if you'd cut the mask using the template, stick it to the wheel and then paint. Of course that way you'd have to work invrsely - first paint the hub and then the tyre?

Yes, Profa, you're correct--the inverse method works better on some wheel/tire moldings. Especially if the rims are recessed or the tire has a rounded shape to the sidewall. In those instances I usually use BareMetal foil or its equivalent to mask the painted rim, then paint the tire.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_6245.jpg)


Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on May 28, 2011, 07:49:12 PM
Well, today I've tested some wood rendering technique.

Wingnut Wings recommend the use of Tamiya XF-59 then Oilt (Burnt Umber) applied with a sponge, and "removed" with another sponge.

On the photo, the result given is show by the half-fuselage.

Very nice result I must say; but too dark for German aircrafts...

...So I've tried to replace the Tamiya XF-59 by Vallejo Yellow (left part of the wing on the photo) and Wood (center part and right part), using the same technique of Burnt Umber and sponge.

... And the result is exactly what I want.

So, I'm impatient to begin the work on my next Albatros...  :-love
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on May 28, 2011, 07:59:31 PM
I looks so good! :-clap
And...Thanks for share with us!!This is very useful! ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on June 28, 2011, 04:01:53 PM
What glue you use to glue PE parts? :-think
Becouse everything is soooooooooooooooooooooooo tiny,and i don't know what type of glue i will use?
Super glue in gel??? :-think
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on June 28, 2011, 04:28:25 PM
Yes, super glue in gel ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Profa on June 28, 2011, 04:37:29 PM
I use regular liquid CA glue or Humbrol gloss, depending on the part, but mostly the former one...
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on June 28, 2011, 04:43:22 PM
Liquid CA glue But for very small parts (those you need for a microscope), I first use Klir or gloss varnish! That helps top lace correctly the mini-part Then, once dry, I put a mini-drop of cyano
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on June 28, 2011, 06:10:49 PM
Thanks for advice. ;) :-flo
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on July 01, 2011, 11:56:35 PM
A bit of a change-of-pace, making your own letters or numerals.

Often I find that the markings I need for a particular model are just not available. In such a case I find a photo or drawing of the marking and copy it into the scale I'm building on my printer. Here is an example of this, using a Luftwaffe code letter. This one is easy since it's all straight lines, but I've had good results with other shapes as well.

First, trim the character you need with enough surrounding paper to tape it to the appropriately colored decal material. Tape the perimeter of the copy to the sheet so that it cannot move during the cutting process. I cut the decal paper in small segments just a little larger than the printed subject so as to save decal paper. Use a very sharp hobby knife blade to then cut around the entirety of the character, making sure to cut deeply enough to scribe the decal.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_7421.jpg)

The next step is to soak the decal and then very carefully remove the excess from around the figure. Notice in this instance that one triangle of material was stubborn-I hadn't quite cut through all the way. A careful pass with the X-Acto blade corrected this.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_7422.jpg)

If the figure is one color only, simply apply to the model. In my case the letter has a white outline. To accomplish this I simply dab almost all of the moisture off of the red character and then slide it onto the white decal material. Make sure not to transfer too much moisture from the first decal film onto the second sheet. Now make sure that everything is dry before proceeding. The next step is to simply cut the correct width outer border color.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_7423.jpg)

The final step is to wet the second sheet and repeat the removal of the excess decal film you cut free. Then transfer the two-piece decal to the model. In some cases I spray a light coat of clear over the two decals before this step to bond the top film to the lower.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_7429.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on July 02, 2011, 06:47:37 AM
Excellent tip, Scott! Thank you!!!
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: pkrasna on October 31, 2011, 04:30:21 PM
Sall asked me to demonstrate some colouring and weathering tehniques of mine. To avoid any long discussions I made some materials to demonstrate the way to do it.

(http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/th_01osnova.jpg) (http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/?action=view&current=01osnova.jpg)
1) I used a spitfire wing to demonstrate the procedure. To recreate the scale model conditions I helped myself with photoshop.

(http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/th_02postshading.jpg) (http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/?action=view&current=02postshading.jpg)
2) First step after the model is coloured and the decals are on is to spray the whole model with matt varnish. This is what you need to do to prepare the model for postshading. With Postshading you actualy darken all lines betwen pannels with heavily diluted black paint.  The lower picture on the white background demonstrates whitch parts needed to be darkened.

(http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/th_03peena.jpg) (http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/?action=view&current=03peena.jpg)
3) Next step is to lighten the central parts of the panels with dilluted sand color. You can use also gray for this stage. The spaces shoud be covered unevenly.

(http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/th_04bela.jpg) (http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/pkrasna/balkan%20models/?action=view&current=04bela.jpg)
4) To break up the whole surface the higlights come handy. This is the third faze of weathering where you adress only few parts of the wing and higlight it with dilluted white color. Be carefull to higlight the parts that are usualy disposed of wear and tear.

This is all for now. Hope you enyojed.

Primo┼ż

 
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on October 31, 2011, 08:01:47 PM
Thank you very much Primoz.
Later i will read this topic in peace. Now i'm in bus, so i can't pay so much attention.
Thank you one more. You will read my reply later. ;)
Ps. If any other forum member want to describe his procedure,there is no problem! :)) :-joke
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on October 31, 2011, 09:10:37 PM
Nice tip!!!
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on November 01, 2011, 11:28:47 PM
I finally read it. Excellent!! :-clap Thank you. ;)
Is this techniques only for airbrush, or it can be used to work with paintbrush? :-think
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: jonbius on December 22, 2011, 03:34:31 AM
Here is some weathering tips I posted in another forum when I was building an Airfix Spitfire Mk. XII. I hope they might be useful to you!

I am a lazy modeler. I see the work that others do, and I really would like to achieve the same results. But I'm also somewhat impatient and a bit lazy with my modeling. I may get all into filling seams on one model, and ignore it on another. Or I may go all out detailing a cockpit, and then on the same model completely ignore weathering the undersides at all just because I am bored with it. (I've even left off decals on the undersides.)

So my techniques are "quick" and a bit lazy. I don't model for contests at all. (I simply don't enter them. That's for another post....  :)) I basically do things purely for fun.

And I do not model for realism. Again, it's all for fun. If it's fun on one build to try and be realistic, I do. But often I just see what I can do and simply enjoy the journey.

 So anyway, with those caveats, I'm going to document how I weather aircraft at Roy's request, and a few others. I'll post it as I go along in this build.

Again- this is "my" method. Mostly ripped off from others, minimized and/or simplified where I feel it's needed. And then I may or may not do all of these steps on any build. (I might not do any of them, sometimes...)

But I'll throw all of them in this build, just for fun. We'll see how it turns out.  ;D

OK- so I started out with  shooting just straight colors- no lightening or darkening. Right out of the bottle with some thinning. All of this is done with my Badger 105 patriot, and I shoot at 8-12 psi.

Step 1- The Canvas
Here is the Airfix Mk. XII I'm working on. It's painted in Pollyscale Azure Blue undersides, and Pollyscale RAAF Foilage Green and Vallejo Model Air Earth on the uppers. The wing leading edges and tail surfaces are Tamiya Flat White.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbNvKjKzMhI/AAAAAAAAFoU/Pr2VaY0Pqf8/s800/DSC00099.JPG)

Step 2- The Fade
I prefer to post-shade rather than pre-shade. I just find it easier. Like I said earlier... I don't worry about realism, so I don't even get into the debate of "to shade or not to shade." I like the style that this technique results in. I always keep in mind that I'm a middle-aged man with a paunch and slightly thinning hair who who gets up once or twice a night to pee. And I play with plastic model toys. ;D

Anyway, I put two or three drops of Tamiya Flat White in the color cup, and then fill it halfway up with 91% alcohol, and mix it up. Then I shoot about half of it out. Why? To make sure I blow through all the thicker stuff. I want very, very thin paint.

Then I basically start filling in between panel lines. I can't really see any color as I shoot, just a small gloss spot where the alcohol hits and is wet for just a second. I just keep filling in and filling in all over, every now and then checking my work. I try to get to the point where it's just a bit obvious, as later weathering will tone it down a bit. It takes some experimenting if you haven't done it. (Side note: I think the fact that I build 20 kits a year has really helped me because it gives me lots of chance for experimenting.) And I don't try to fully fill things in. I just sort of dodge around and make swirls and so forth. I don't even let off the trigger, I just jump from panel to panel.

So it ends up looking like this:

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbNvLDBGSSI/AAAAAAAAFoY/QP06MPCXeqs/s800/DSC00100.JPG)

Step 3- The Lines
Next up are the panel lines. Some folks like to use dark gray, or a mix of Tamiya Smoke and NATO Black. I prefer Tamiya Flat Black. I want to see my post-shading. Again- that's the style I prefer, so adjust to your tastes.

I put three or four drops in the cup, and then fill it halfway again with 91% alcohol. Again, I blow through half of the color, and then test it on a test surface. If it's a bit too dark, I add more alcohol, and repeat the procedure.

I start by getting just the lightest flow going, and fill in the panel lines. At 8-12psi, with paint this thin, you can get a panel line sized pattern, so I just keep it real tight. I get right down on it- probably a half an inch or closer. Again- experimenting will yield great results. And I just do an entire section in one "pass". Basically, when I get the paint flowing right, I just start tracing the panel lines, almost like I'm driving around them. Up one, back down the other, across to this one. It will take 4 or 5 passes before you can see color built up. I like it to be rather apparent, so it takes a while.

After I've done the entire aircraft, I go back and redo any areas that appear too light.

I then go over them again, but this time from 1-2 inches away, going for a lighter look. This helps "soften" things up.

Here is the result:

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbNvMx3N5lI/AAAAAAAAFok/c03TGAvNyvo/s800/DSC00103.JPG)

Some notes:
- If I do the undersides, I may use a lighter color than flat black for the panel lines. On this one, I used Tamiya German Gray.
- I generally fill in areas around the control surfaces, and major panel lines, a bit heavier. Also, areas that may have oil staining will get some additional coverage, as that will play into later weathering.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbNvNyag-gI/AAAAAAAAFoo/UsP3daUC8WQ/s800/DSC00104.JPG)

On to Step 4- Playing with Oils!

This next part is something I often use independent of the above methods. In fact, I generally don't combine them simply because I don't want to take the time. But I figure it would be neat to see how it turns out.

The tools for this exercise are some artists oils in white and raw umber, a bit of odorless turpenoid (not the "green kind!), a toothpick or two, and some wide brushes, about 1/4 inch wide, and somewhat stiff..

Here you can see the wing before any oils are added. (The bright flecks are shiny spots from brushing off the wing with a paper towel- they only showed up in camera.)

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbShutwC_RI/AAAAAAAAFpI/sBNAEA75j1w/s800/DSC00115.JPG)

I mixed up a dab of white, and a dot (literally) of raw umber in a small cup, with some turpenoid, to get a dirty looking wash.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbShu18H3NI/AAAAAAAAFpM/uq7pk6fB2bA/s800/DSC00116.JPG)

Next, I dip the tip of the 1/4 brush into this, just enough to soak some up, and I start bouncing it up and down around the wing until the whole thing is covered. it should not be soupy.... just moist. If it's too wet, just dab the brush on a paper towel until it dries up a bit. When I'm done, it leaves a fairly distinct layer of blotchy white. This photo does not show how prominent it is, but you can sort of see it.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbShvTMcIFI/AAAAAAAAFpQ/x1naWhxNB5U/s800/DSC00117.JPG)

Once that dries- just 5 or so minutes will do, I take a clean brush similar to the one just used, and I dab it around as needed to tone down the effect. (Or, if needed, you can add more of the wash to increase the effect.) it's really cool because you can control the degree of "dirt" easily. if it's too much altogether, just rub it off with a bit of turpenoid.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbShv4Lt_kI/AAAAAAAAFpU/Q5e79U0t7Mo/s800/DSC00119.JPG)

Step 5: Shine, shine, shine!

I like to add some paint chipping. Because this bird is getting dirtied up pretty well, I'll go heavy on it. I use Tamiya Flat Aluminum (XF-16), a Prismacolor Silver oil pencil, and the same brush from step 4.

i start by getting some XF-16 on the brush tip, and dabbing it on to a paper towel until most of the paint is gone. Then I "bounce" it up and down wherever I want paint to look chipped, building it up as I go. I like this method because it "layers" the wear fairly nicely, and will stand up when later steps may tone down the effect.

I then go behind that with a Prismacolor Silver pencil to add scuffs and so forth in smaller areas.

I ended up with this:

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbShwCWsu-I/AAAAAAAAFpY/jypQq4LNtf0/s800/DSC00120.JPG)

When that's all done, you get this:

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_hj2CaKxeuog/TbShxM3nCqI/AAAAAAAAFpg/2JvnJVDQjdw/s800/DSC00122.JPG)

It looks a bit heavy, but later steps- especially the Future and Flat Coat will blend it a bit. And the oils are forgiving enough that if you want to tone it down a bit more at this point, you can.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on December 22, 2011, 07:16:50 AM
Tips are good and fast ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on December 22, 2011, 09:33:17 AM
Very nice Jonbius!! :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on December 22, 2011, 10:23:38 AM
Sorry, I have completely forgottent to present here my technique for weathering...

So, after the primer I airbrush metal color (generally alu) as base. Then with a sponge, I make some "blotches" with maskol (or equivalent products, like Neo from Gunze) at the locations the paint of the aircraft is suffering the most from manutention, vibrations, etc.
I airbrush the final color and, after having let the time needed to dry, I gently remove the Maskol with a Q-tip...
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on December 22, 2011, 02:36:38 PM
Thank Daniel!! :-clap
I'm very glad to see that this topic is alive,and growing every day... ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on March 13, 2012, 10:28:48 AM
So you have discarded plastic frets after removed parts.... just cut them into pieces and get mixing sticks for your paint.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on March 13, 2012, 02:52:59 PM
Nice idea! ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on March 13, 2012, 03:40:31 PM
I have a nice "sprue pile" here too. I use it for antenna wires, scratchbuilding, etc, etc. Eduard has really nice frames with some of their kits and I've enhanced my collection!
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: jonbius on March 13, 2012, 03:55:08 PM
A friend of mine actually uses old pieces of sprue to make figures. He melts them down, gives them a rough shape, and then carves them into some great looking figures.

I sometimes use longer pieces of sprue as a back-scratcher. :)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on March 13, 2012, 06:03:27 PM
Good...
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on March 13, 2012, 06:07:33 PM
Here's an old trick I've used over the years when doing conversions. Sometimes there is a need to reshape an original fuselage or wing section that is almost the right shape, but not quite. Often the reshaping will make the plastic either too thin or remove some of the original completely leaving a void. In these cases I merely make a temporary bulkhead in the area and pour a small amount of resin into the cavity I'll be working on. This gives me a solid plug that will allow the reshaping to be completed without ruining the process.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_9476.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on March 13, 2012, 07:02:47 PM
:-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on March 13, 2012, 10:02:21 PM
 :-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on March 24, 2012, 03:07:11 PM
Masking spinners and other complex shapes sometimes can be a headache. Here are a couple of masking methods I use that have worked over the years.

First is simply to paint the spinner one of the colors. Preferably you will paint the small-end color first so that the masking tape is easy to apply. Then, just spend some time carefully making a round tube of tape the diameter needed for the size of color band you need and stick it on the spinner.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_9567.jpg)

I also use a hole template to do this. Simply stick the spinner in the appropriate sized hole and very carefully align it, then spray. Be very careful to lay on light dusting coats of paint so that it doesn't bleed around the template mask.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_9570.jpg)
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_9569.jpg)

Another nice masking aid is aluminum tubing of the appropriate diameter. This has the drawback that you can only paint the larger portion of the spinner, but it still works quite well.

Here's the finished spinner that prompted this entry in Sall's thread, done with the masking tape method:
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_9558.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on March 24, 2012, 03:26:24 PM
Good method mate :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on March 24, 2012, 08:24:20 PM
Yes,great!!! :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on May 30, 2012, 11:26:05 PM
Here's another masking idea that I just tried, and it worked great!

Masking canopy frames can be a test of patience and vocabulary. The clear parts I needed to mask have a very faint frame molded in making it really hard to cut. Out of frustration I CA glued two brand new X-acto blades together. All that remained was to apply my favorite tape to the transparency and cut along the frame lines.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_0094.jpg)

Here's the first experimental transparency:
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_0129.jpg)

If a wider frame is required I'll just glue a spacer shim between the blades to get the right width.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on May 30, 2012, 11:47:44 PM
Excellent! :-clap :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Ernie on May 31, 2012, 03:43:53 AM
That method of spacing the blades like that also works great for cutting strips of masking tape to mask off waterlines, cheat lines on airliners and stripes. I had forgotten about that until Scott posted his tip.
Ernie
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on May 31, 2012, 04:38:00 AM
I made a rolling cutter some years ago with the same method to cut 1/4" wide striping for a 1/1 airplane, then forgot the whole idea until the other night! :-/
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on May 31, 2012, 06:04:52 AM
This is so good idea :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on January 12, 2013, 09:10:40 PM
Masking camouflage demarkation lines can sometimes be difficult. Some schemes call for a "hard" line and this is easy, just use masking tape or other mask fixed tightly to the surface. Then there are the blended type where an airbrush can be used freehand. The third, and for me hardest, is a combination of the two, a rather hard line but with some overspray evident.

The method I've chosen to use with my own modification is to place a small spacer on the sticky side of the tape to keep the masked edge up off the surface. Others have used thread or string for this but I decided to try stretched sprue. Simply cut the tape to the shape desired and then add the sprue, sticking it on a little bit from the edge.By changing the thickness of the sprue and its place on the tape you can achieve quite a nice hard line with a blended look to it.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_1323_zps9310c1a6.jpg)

When applying the tape to the model, make sure that the tape does not stick to the surface on the area you're going to paint, and a nice result is easily accomplished. When painting, spray straight down on the edge of the tape and just a tiny bit will dust under the raised tape.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_1326_zps21d01754.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on January 12, 2013, 09:20:04 PM
Good method :-ok Faster and more precise then to make small self adhesive roles and put it under tape for distance :)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on January 12, 2013, 09:23:59 PM
Exactly so! I don't have any BluTack here at all and had to come up with something. The sprue is easily made to whatever thickness one requires and we have plenty of that material lying about!
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on January 12, 2013, 09:31:27 PM
Even coper wire (or tin) is great to use ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on January 12, 2013, 11:15:45 PM
Oh, I hadn't thought of that! I have a large roll of copper wire for scratchbuilding that will work great. :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on January 12, 2013, 11:59:21 PM
Good one!! :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: GregM on January 13, 2013, 08:36:52 PM
I'm not big into weathering but here is one technique I tried last year for paint chipping. 

You start with a base coat of silver to replicate the bare aluminum that will show through.

(http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy360/WIXerGreg/Hellcat/024-1.jpg)


You then apply a small amount of water in the areas that you want your paint chips.  Using household table salt and the water to hold it, apply the salt and water in the areas and shapes that you want your paint chips.  Allow it to dry thoroughly overnight.

(http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy360/WIXerGreg/Hellcat/027.jpg)


After it's dry then paint your color coat(s).  When those are thoroughly dry then go back and pop off all the salt that's now under the paint.  When you pop the salt off you'll expose the silver underneath.

(http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy360/WIXerGreg/Hellcat/024-2.jpg)


(http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy360/WIXerGreg/Hellcat/020.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on January 13, 2013, 08:48:01 PM
Nice :-ok Last days I think about making post of chipping method and in followings days I will arrange this :))
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on January 14, 2013, 05:04:49 AM
 :-clap :-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on February 04, 2013, 02:31:19 AM
A little thing to add to the painting tips, really not important but handy to do: When I was getting ready to mottle the sides of the Me-262 this morning I decided to use another partially-built kit to set up my airbrush correctly and to practice a bit before painting the "important" model. Not much of a tip, but the practice does get one's mind in the right place for spraying mottled camouflage!
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/IMG_1357_zps0fc58459.jpg)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on February 04, 2013, 07:21:17 AM
:-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on May 02, 2013, 06:31:23 PM
Good tips of airbrush maintenance

https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/troubleshooting
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on May 03, 2013, 05:11:42 PM
This is useful!! :-clap
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on June 05, 2013, 08:03:29 AM
You have seen my new arrival yesterday, Tessa protective tape. Today I have made ultimate rigid test I can do  :-danger

I have took one kit in build process and on bare shine plastic I have spray a coat of Vallejo paint. You know well problems with this paints and worst and most stupid thing you can do is to start paint over unprepared plastic. After paint was dry, I have mask surfaces and spray any other paint and as you see I did not even completely cover surface. And... I perfectly removed masking tape without any problems and damage!!!!

Tessa tape for sensitive surface is top recommended and you will not regret if you give it top priority in next acquisition  :-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Sall on June 06, 2013, 05:33:59 PM
 :-clap :-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Second Air Force on September 10, 2013, 04:30:31 PM
A new tip on the clear gloss overcoat before decals:

I have been having some problems with decals silvering after application lately. My Testors Clear Lacquer didn't seem to give a smooth enough surface over the typical flat paint I use. After quite a lot of experimenting I have come up with a solution that has been used for years by many modelers. Now I simply wet-sand the entire model lightly with 6000 grit sandpaper, taking care not to rub the paint off of high spots and fairings etc. After wet-sanding I give the model a thorough cleaning and then apply "Pledge Floor Care Multi Surface" finish. This used to be called "Future" here in the U.S. The same product is available pretty much world-wide but may go by a different name. I "thin" the clear with a small amount of window cleaner to help it flow evenly.
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/SACSept001_zpsa2823df6.jpg) (http://s174.photobucket.com/user/2AF/media/SACSept001_zpsa2823df6.jpg.html)
(http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/2AF/SACSept002_zps1a9e8399.jpg) (http://s174.photobucket.com/user/2AF/media/SACSept002_zps1a9e8399.jpg.html)
The key to spraying this is to dust on a very light amount each time until a good gloss is achieved. Getting the application just right takes some practice and the material will run quite badly if sprayed too heavily. If you over-apply it you can often wipe the excess away with a damp towel. If any of y'all decide to try this, practice on something for a while before using it on a "good" model. I let the Future dry for a couple of days before applying decals so that setting solutions don't affect the clear. After decals are applied you can simply spray your favorite flat or gloss clear right over the top with no problems!
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on September 10, 2013, 04:50:10 PM
Thanks for tip ;)
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Tweety on September 25, 2013, 09:22:49 PM
 :-wave :-clap :-salut
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on August 11, 2014, 08:28:47 PM
Very important material datasheets

http://www.stanbridges.com.au/safety-data-sheets
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on August 11, 2014, 09:18:39 PM
Excellent and useful!
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on August 11, 2014, 09:21:39 PM
:-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: Jicehem on September 19, 2014, 03:32:13 PM
Hi,

A lot of very good ideas.

Jicehem :-wave
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: draken35 on March 28, 2016, 09:01:58 AM
Here is a little tuto about my use of pastels.

First, the pastels are used at the very end of the build: aircraft is finished, matt varnish airbrushed.

I use different kind of pastels: my preferred ones are from Tamiya but I use also pigments from MiG (essentially for smoke effects) and, for the nuances Tamiya don't have, some chalks boughts in specialized shops. Those ones must be reduced in powder to be used.

I put a paintbrush (size depends of the surface size of the model) into the pastel choosen, then I remove the excess of pastel on a sheet of soft paper. I apply gently the pastel on the surface (each panel is treated separately; that can take some time to finish of course...), starting from the center of the panel and going near the extremities - but taking care not to cover ALL the panel.
To be precized that if the panel is covered by two different colors of paint, each color is treated separately too.

When finished you can wash the paintbrushes with water. Use different paintbrushes for the different colors because if the paintbrush is wet you will not obtain a good result.
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: No.1 on March 28, 2016, 09:35:59 AM
This is it :-ok
Title: Re: Some modeling techniques
Post by: modellius on March 28, 2016, 10:23:38 AM
Very useful, thanks !