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HOW TO: Natural Metal Finishes

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Second Air Force:
Letipapa,

I once used silver paint with a tiny touch of light grey in it to darken it. It did change shades a little bit but it seemed to lose the "metal" look in the process.

I have had good success with these Testors metal finishes. I don't know if you're able to buy any of these products in Europe, but they work really, really well. All of these products (except the "Silver" on the top left) are ready to airbrush right out of the bottle. You MUST use a perfectly clean airbrush and bottle with a screen on the pickup tube, and it will take several bottles of paint to do very large models. The sealer is recommended if you're going to mask over the paint, but I don't always use it as a final clear coat.
HOW TO: Natural Metal Finishes

Here are two more products. The small bottle of Metalizer gives much the same results as the Testors products. The SNJ system is a bit different in that it consists of the spray on material and a bottle of actual aluminum powder that you apply and rub in to the surface to give the aluminum finish.
HOW TO: Natural Metal Finishes

And my favorite, the BareMetal Foil.
HOW TO: Natural Metal Finishes

Scott

Letipapa:
Hey, Scott, thank you :-flo :-flo :-flo
There are Testors metalizers in the shops here and I think I'll try something with them. Only there is the fact that I already sprayed with auto lacquer (to see all mistakes), so I am thinking is the surface good enough. Anyway, there is a lot of sanding waiting me on Mystere. When I finish it, do I need to put something on before I use this metalizers.

For the rest of the products I do not think its easy to find in Belgrade, allthough it could be.
 :-wave

Second Air Force:
Auto lacquer should be a good sub-surface finish for the Testors products. I use lacquer auto body primers, both grey and red oxide, as the base for the Testors Metalizer Lacquer. If you spray the Metalizer directly onto bare plastic use a very light dusting coat first to "seal" the softer plastic from the Metalizer thinner. The Testors materials are all very "hot" and will etch plastic easily if you lay it on thickly. Don't ever spray Metalizer over enamel--it will lift the enamel just like an application of paint stripper. (I know from experience....... :-red)

It's actually quite hard to spray a thick coat of this paint as it is extremely thin and covers well. The fact that the coats should go on thin makes it very important to handle finished models with cloth gloves--the Metalizer can be affected by the oils in our skin and frequent handling. One of the good things about these products is that it is relatively easy to fix little problems by overspraying worn areas with a new coat and burnishing/polishing it to match the surrounding surface.

Scott

No.1:
SNJ are among the first to appear on market many years ago. I have never use it but do have used Testors products. There is also some old products, not available today like a Liqui a Plate and Rub N Buff. Did anybody use them?

Cheers :-ok

Second Air Force:
I used Liqui-Plate on the vacuform F-89 I started this thread with. That was the product I couldn't remember the name of...... :-roll It worked pretty much the same as the other products as I recall all these years later. I still have the "How To" book that came with the Liqui-Plate and it is quite thorough. I don't think I used Rub N Buff but I do remember the name.

Scott

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